The 1930s was a time of great change in American society

The 1930s was a time of great change in American society. In 1929 the stock market crashed causing a widespread amount of unemployment and an economic crisis that had never been seen in American history. To make matters worse a large drought in the Midwest caused financial ruining for many American farmers, who were forced to leave their homes and head west to look for jobs. This drought became known as The Dust Bowl. By 1934, the drought covered seventy-five percent of the country, affecting twenty-seven states. The central causes of this disaster were a severe drought formed by a lack of government regulation, which lead to over farming.

Beginning in the early 1930s, most states in the Midwest were experiencing a severe drought. This drought, combined with severe dust storms, caused crops to dry up causing many failures throughout the region. For example, Caroline Henderson, a farmer in Oklahoma, described the devastation in a letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in 1935. “Yet now our daily physical torture, confusion of mind, and gradual wearing down of courage, seem to make that long continued hope look like a vanishing dream. For we are in the worst of the dust storm area where “dust to eat” is not merely a figure of speech, but the phrasing of a bitter reality.” These dust storms forced millions of Americans out of their homes and were a central cause of the Dust Bowl.