In this paper I will introduce one of the Shakespeare sonnets which is one of the most beautiful sonnets

In this paper I will introduce one of the Shakespeare sonnets which is one of the most beautiful sonnets, also I will talk about Shakespeare’s life and his works in the early modern English. 
 

William Shakespeare was born in Statfordon-Avon, England in April 1564 and died in April 23 1616.he was The son of John Shakespeare a Glover and his mother was Mary Arden who came of wealthy framing family.He married to Anne Hathaway the daughter of a farmer and they got three children.

Shakespeare was a really famous writer in his century and he has a huge impact on developing english from the old to the modern one. he started to write sonnets and many other writes he wrote most of his erotic poems Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece from 1593 to 1594. Both of these poems there dedicated to the Earl of Southampton. In the first period of writing for Shakespeare he developed his writing as much as he could only two of the plays he wrote would be common knowledge to any bloke. He wrote play and poems like Titus Andronicus , The Taming of the Shrew and an early version of Hamlet. William Shakespeare devotes the major part of his sonnet sequence to a young man and the rest are devoted to a woman. The language Shakespeare used to describe his love toward these two persons is totally different. In the sonnet sequence, his love toward the young man can be described as the compassionate love.+
As we know sonnets have different structure from other poems a sonnet has problem and resolution.The structure of sonnets is categorized into four parts each part has its own role in the sonnet. Sonnets dictate the length and style and, most sonnets are 14 lines in length, these 14 lines contain of 3 quatrains and a couplet in the end. Usually in the quatrains the writer talks about the problems in the sonnet and doesn’t show the content of the sonnet until the end. However, in the last two lines which is called couplet the writer summers up the sonnet and gives a resolute for the sonnet.The sonnets written in a meter called iambic pentameter with an alternating ABAB rhyme scheme. The writer chooses words that alternate between an unstressed and a stressed syllable. 
  the sonnet 130 by william shakspear is the sonnet that i will talk about and explain it in this paper.
My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damask’d, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:
   And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
   As any she belied with false compare.

the first quatrin:
My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun; A  
Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;B   
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;A   
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.B   
the second quatrian:
I have seen roses damask’d, red and white,C   
But no such roses see I in her cheeks; D  
And in some perfumes is there more delight C  
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. D  
the third quatrian:
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know E  
That music hath a far more pleasing sound; F  
I grant I never saw a goddess go;E   
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: F  
the couplet:
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare G  
 As any she belied with false compare. G  
  
Sonnet 130 is one of the most beautiful sonnets of Shakespeare, which is considered as a romantic poem. In this sonnet Shakespeare tries to describe his mistress in a different way different from other romantic poems. he compares his love to things that are supposed to be beautiful. William Shakespeare’s Sonnet 130 has a rhyme scheme and a rugged tone, and he uses several rhetorical devices such as Imagery, hyperbole, satire, and allegory. 
 
imagery is one of the rhetorical devices that Shakespeare used in the sonnet 130. Shakespeare depended on strong sensory images to get his satirical message across. Imagery is a poetic device that employs the five senses to create an image in the mind of the reader. In this sonnet, Shakespeare draws on sight, sound and smell when he compares his mistress’ eyes to the sun, her lips to red coral, her breasts to white snow, her hair to black wires, her cheeks to red and white roses, her breath to perfume and her voice to music.
  
the second one is hyperbole, hyperbole is a form of speech that exaggerates the facts in order to make a point. there are many romantic poets who exaggerate the beauty of their mistresses, insisting that their eyes are more beautiful than the sun, their hair fairer than hold or their cheeks redder than roses. however, Shakespeare decides to exaggerate how unattractive his mistress is. he compares her hair to black wire, her breath to reeks, her breasts are grayish, and her voice is grating.
   
in addition, Satire is a another one that has been used in this sonnet as a literary device. satire is the use of humors, irony, or ridicule to expose and criticize people’s vices. In writing this poem, he was gently poking fun at the conventional romantic poems that were being written by other poets. In pointing out that his mistress’ eyes are not more beautiful than the sun, that her hair is not made of gold threads, that her cheeks are not as red as roses and that her breath is not finer than perfume.
  

Iambic pentameter refers to a certain kind of line of poetry, and has to do with the number of syllables in the line and the emphasis placed on those syllables. Many of Shakespeare’s works are often used as great examples of iambic pentameter.

Here is the scansion of the sonnet:

          ,           ,          ,        ,         ,
      My mist|ress’ eyes | are noth|ing like | the sun;
       ,          ,          ,                  ,   ,
      Coral | is far | more^red, | than her / lips red:
           ,         ,           ,           ,           ,
      If snow | be white,| why then | her breasts | are dun;
           ,          ,       T     T     T      2      ,
      If hairs | be wires,| black wires grow | on her head.
                 ,   ,      ,          ,          ,
      I have / seen ros|es dam|asked, red | and white,
           ,         ,      ,    ,             ,
      But no | such^ros|es see | I in | her cheeks;
                 ,   ,    ,                ,        ,
      And in / some per|fumes is | there more | delight
            ,          ,            ,        ,          ,
      Than in | the breath | that from | my mist|ress reeks.
          ,         ,          ,           ,        ,
      I love | to hear | her speak,| yet well | I know
            ,       ,       ,            ,         ,
      That mus|ic hath | a far | more* pleas|ing sound:
          ,        ,      ,       ,        ,
      I grant | I nev|er saw | a god|dess go,
          ,           ,          ,        ,               ,
      My mist|ress, when | she walks,| treads on | the ground.
           ,          x         ,          ,         ,
      And yet | by heaven,| I think | my love | as rare,
          ,    ,        ,           ,         ,
      As an|y she | belied | with false | compare.

 In conclusion, every sonnet often has a twist in the end to conclude the thought of the writer, in this poem, the twist comes when the reader sees that, despite his criticisms, the author does actually love his mistress. what he tries to show is that love doesn’t need these things to be beautiful in order to love someone, you have to accept who are they in real without comparing them to other things